Ruth Friswell

P3 ‘Housing’

This project required us to design housing for both families and an additional domestic group. There should also be a community facility to serve both the new residents and wider Heeley.

Disability should never be a hindrance on someones living standards, nor compromise on the design of their house. For this reason I wanted to create a space where those with disabilities and their families could come together to help and support one another, creating a micro-community within the wider community of Heeley.
These houses are designed to suit all needs but without compromising on the needs of other able bodied family members. The community can come together in a central space, for residents only, while opportunities to learn skills and for employment are provided with a cafe and wood/metal workshop and shop.

 


P2 ‘Library’

This project required us to design a library with an urban facade that addressed its surroundings and created a connection with its environment.

In an age of tablets and the internet we rarely take a moment to sit and read a book. At the centre of Sharrowvale road, a hub for creatives and independent business, will sit a ‘no technology’ library, calling for a move back towards physical books. Here people can take time away from the demands of technology and use the unique reading spaces to research or work on projects without constant connection. People can also reconnect with the physicality of books in the three storey referencing library and the book binding and calligraphy classes. Books make up the fabric of the building, presenting the buildings intentions to all who enter.


P1 ‘Hatchery’

This project required us to house up to 40 chickens throughout the hatching and laying process and give an educational space, as well as separate space for staff and maintenance.

The life cycle of an animal is a unique process; allowing the public to interact and learn about this process will broaden education and understanding. This hatchery sits at the centre of Millhouses park, a well maintained parkland that attracts locals throughout the seasons. The hope is to draw visitors through the trees and into the centre. Here they can observe the hatching and growing process and learn how to keep their own chickens. The design aims to sit under the canopy, not intruding on the views across the parkland but framing the view out of the building from within. It also uses natural and locally sourced materials to show the connection to life and the natural environment.

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